Tag Archives: charity

A Special Suggestion for this Holiday Season

A special suggestion for this Holiday Season

 

Greetings, friends! It’s that time of year again—shopping, carols, good will to man. We all know it and willingly deal with the stress of finding just that perfect gift for the loved ones in our lives. In the midst of all this crazed activity, there is also the underlying knowledge that for many of us, this year is likely to be a bit on the lean side.

We all know that the economy is still shaky and many people have not yet regained their jobs. This means that their families may be looking at a Christmas that is less than stellar, at best or downright grim, at worst. For that reason, I’d like to bring up something I posted a few weeks back: the Aphorisms for Heretics, specifically Aphorism # 33 “Help where you can.”

Americans are notorious for riding to the rescue, but shy about admitting or accepting help when we need it. It’s both a great strength and a flaw in our national character, part of what makes us what we are, really. That’s a good thing, and we need to take advantage of it, now more than ever. Many charities are feeling the bite of the bad economy with a severe drop in donations at a time when more people than ever are in need of their services.  Many people are feeling alone and abandoned, in dire straights because of a sudden loss of jobs or security and having a hard time recovering their feet.

We here at Heartfelt would like to send out an appeal to our readers: “Help where you can.”

That’s it in a nutshell. Here are some ideas you could use:

If you are able, send a donation to your favorite charity in the name of a person you know who can’t.

Give canned goods and personal toiletries to the local food drive, food bank, or shelter in your area.

 If your town has a ‘coats for kids’ drive, donate any unused or outgrown coats, hats, gloves and mittens to keep kids warm this winter. Or you may donate them to a shelter in your area that could use them.

Some areas have programs to assist with heating costs for families in need, donate if you are able, or suggest the name of someone you know who may be in danger of freezing to death this winter. They may not be aware these programs even exist.

If you can’t spare the funds, maybe you can give some time? Spend an hour a week helping out at your local food bank, blood drive, family shelter, animal shelter, toys for tots program, or any other charitable program in your area that you feel is worthy of your time and effort. Many of these groups are working hard, but just don’t have enough hands to get things done effectively. They could use yours and would be grateful.

Shovel a sidewalk clear of snow for an elderly person in your neighborhood. Not only will it keep our elders safer, but many cities will fine them if the walk isn’t cleared within a certain amount of time, and a person on a fixed income just can’t afford that. You can help someone out and stick it to your city council at the same time, isn’t that great?

I’ll close now, but I will include some links that can help you get started. You can also check your city and county websites for further ideas on where you can help. Your local Red Cross and the Salvation Army are always good places to start. As Americans, we’ve dashed across oceans to lend a hand when needed; now it’s time cross the street with the same intention. Find your peace, friends.

Rev. Zita

www.redcross.org

www.unitedway.org

www.aspca.org

www.salvationarmy.org

Greetings, friends! It’s that time of year again—shopping, carols, good will to man. We all know it and willingly deal with the stress of finding just that perfect gift for the loved ones in our lives. In the midst of all this crazed activity, there is also the underlying knowledge that for many of us, this year is likely to be a bit on the lean side.

We all know that the economy is still shaky and many people have not yet regained their jobs. This means that their families may be looking at a Christmas that is less than stellar, at best or downright grim, at worst. For that reason, I’d like to bring up something I posted a few weeks back: the Aphorisms for Heretics, specifically Aphorism # 33 “Help where you can.”

Americans are notorious for riding to the rescue, but shy about admitting or accepting help when we need it. It’s both a great strength and a flaw in our national character, part of what makes us what we are, really. That’s a good thing, and we need to take advantage of it, now more than ever. Many charities are feeling the bite of the bad economy with a severe drop in donations at a time when more people than ever are in need of their services.  Many people are feeling alone and abandoned, in dire straights because of a sudden loss of jobs or security and having a hard time recovering their feet.

We here at Heartfelt would like to send out an appeal to our readers: “Help where you can.”

That’s it in a nutshell. Here are some ideas you could use:

If you are able, send a donation to your favorite charity in the name of a person you know who can’t.

Give canned goods and personal toiletries to the local food drive, food bank, or shelter in your area.

 If your town has a ‘coats for kids’ drive, donate any unused or outgrown coats, hats, gloves and mittens to keep kids warm this winter. Or you may donate them to a shelter in your area that could use them.

Some areas have programs to assist with heating costs for families in need, donate if you are able, or suggest the name of someone you know who may be in danger of freezing to death this winter. They may not be aware these programs even exist.

If you can’t spare the funds, maybe you can give some time? Spend an hour a week helping out at your local food bank, blood drive, family shelter, animal shelter, toys for tots program, or any other charitable program in your area that you feel is worthy of your time and effort. Many of these groups are working hard, but just don’t have enough hands to get things done effectively. They could use yours and would be grateful.

Shovel a sidewalk clear of snow for an elderly person in your neighborhood. Not only will it keep our elders safer, but many cities will fine them if the walk isn’t cleared within a certain amount of time, and a person on a fixed income just can’t afford that. You can help someone out and stick it to your city council at the same time, isn’t that great?

I’ll close now, but I will include some links that can help you get started. You can also check your city and county websites for further ideas on where you can help. Your local Red Cross and the Salvation Army are always good places to start. As Americans, we’ve dashed across oceans to lend a hand when needed; now it’s time cross the street with the same intention. Find your peace, friends.

Rev. Zita

www.redcross.org

www.unitedway.org

www.aspca.org

www.salvationarmy.org

Giving Back

Since today is National Make a Difference Day, this seems like the appropriate time to start begging for people to help their communities out. We all know that the economy sucks and that more of us need help than in previous years. Unfortunately there are also less of us giving since we all have less to go around. That being said, I am begging you to please donate food, time, or gently used clothes, housewares, furniture, shoes, bags, and anything else you think someone may need to get that hand up. It is so important for us to give back as much as we can.

If you live in Central Wisconsin like we do, here are some links that may help you find a place to donate those much needed items or maybe a place to volunteer that fits in with your schedule or ideas.

The Salvation Army

Catholic Charities
United Way
Red Cross
Portage County Hunger and Poverty Prevention
Operation Bootstrap

Keep in mind that the holidays are coming up as well. Donating over the next few months can make the holidays so much happier and nicer for those who are in need this year.

If you live outside of Central WI, some of these organizations have chapters nation wide, and are always in need of volunteers or for supplies. Give what you are able.

Thank you all for reading.